The Twentieth Century Literary Club met at the beautiful country home of Cynthia Mizell on Jan. 28. Ladies were welcomed by hostesses Sue Ellen Smith, Ruth Dunn, Marcia Brown and Cynthia Mizell; hostess Michelle Potter was absent due to a family emergency. An assortment of beverages and appetizers were enjoyed. Cynthia’s mother, Sue Carol Lane, was introduced and welcomed as our guest.

Following a blessing given by Sue Ellen Smith, a delicious meal of chicken-and-rice casserole, broccoli salad, mustard carrots and rolls was shared, followed by desserts of sour-cream poundcake and pina-colada cake made by Cynthia, and a chocolate-cherry crunch made by Sue Ellen Smith.

President Jolaine Konstantinidis opened the meeting by expressing gratitude to the hostesses. The roll call, treasurer’s report and reading of the minutes followed. Happy January wishes were extended to Rosanne Collins and Happy New Year wishes were extended to one and all. Favors of assorted magnet bookmarks were distributed.

An unanimous election as Honorary Life members followed for longtime, faithful members—Betty Aaron and Phyllis NeSmith—on a motion by the club officers and a second by the club members. Both members are so deserving of this honor.

Jolaine Konstantinidis, following the year’s theme of “The Heroic Women of World War II,” presented a program on Sophia Scholl, a German student and anti-Nazi political activist born in 1921 and executed in 1943. Her father was the mayor of her hometown and recognized as a Nazi critic. Sophia was brought up in the Lutheran church, was an excellent student and led a carefree childhood. She actually was a member of the League of German Girls, a youth group supporting the Nazi Party; her brother, Hans, at first felt as she did. She and her father discussed frequently their varying views. Her feelings changed when her brothers were arrested in 1937 for participating in anti-Nazi groups and her father was sent to prison for making a critical remark about Hitler. She was a talented artist and a prolific reader who was increasingly opposed to the actions of the government. She and six other core members began writing and circulating the White Rose, six pamphlets telling of the inhumane treatment of Jews and Soviet POWs. She and her brother were both found guilty of treason. No testimony was allowed for them and they were both beheaded in 1943.

Jolaine was at first interested in Sophia Scholl because Scholl was also her maiden name. She chose Sophia Scholl for her presentation as she read of her courage and her willingness to stand up for others, even as she lost her own life. It was an appropriate evening for this program on Jan. 28, because Jan. 27 was International Holocaust Remembrance Day and the 74-year anniversary of the closing of Auschwitz, the main Nazi death camp. Our club members shared amazement at the number of people in today’s world who do not believe the Holocaust actually occurred.

Jolaine distributed momentos of rose bookmarks as a remembrance of her program.

Books suggested for reading were “The Light Over London” by Julia Kelly and “Trust Your Eyes” by Linwood Barclay.

Ladies present were Pam Ames, Marcia Brown, Rosanne Collins, Ruth Dunn, Debbie Hackney, Michele Keen, Jolaine Konstantinidis, Stephanie McAnly, Cynthia Mizell, Pat Moore, Irene Pooser, Heather Prevatt, Sylvia Reinhart, Sue Carol Lane, Lynn Shelfer, Olivia Shelfer, Sue Ellen Smith, Linda Waldron, Linda Williams and Terry Womack.

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