turkey point

AP file photo

The twin reactors at the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station near Miami rely on water for cooling.

We constantly hear about doom and gloom from climate change. It’s the end of the world; just ask Chicken Little. Both sides arguing over it — is it or is it not real? One thing is sure: We certainly have issues to deal with or endure consequences.

Have you heard about the “methane dragon that lurks in the deep sea?” These are methane deposits under the ocean floor, 40 mile off of North Carolina. Global warming is causing the methane to rise up from below sea floor and pollute our atmosphere. Oceanographer and microbiologist Samantha Joye shares her perspective: “I hate to say this is a ticking time bomb because I don’t want to scare the [crap] out of people. But it scares the [crap] out of me.”

How about climate impacts from solar or wind farms? Climatic impacts from solar photovoltaic systems are about 10 times smaller than wind systems. Wind farms are fine for electricity but add to warming. Everyone wants to jump on the latest craze without research to justify changes. We charge ahead without thorough vetting.

Nuclear power is at risk from global warming. These “clean” power plants require water to cool reactors. The discharge of used cooling water must be monitored to prevent thermal pollution. They have maximum water temps they can accept, and in some places are precariously close to this limit at times. Some plants have had to shut down temporarily because the water was too warm to use.

Trees are an easy climate fix and have more potential then previously thought. Planting trees is something anyone can do. So is dietary change. “One of the best things people can do is to reduce the consumption of beef,” says Robin Chazdon at the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut. “A big driver of deforestation has been the creation of cattle pastures.”

In Glynn County, Ga., Wes Wolfe reports they are concerned that mangroves could displace their salt marshes. We have seen the migration of mangroves to the north with milder winters. There are studies and papers to spark interest in exploring what could happen. By the way, this is exactly where that cargo ship just flipped and leaked an undetermined amount of fuel. More damage to fragile environments.

This information was from the Sept. 5 edition of “Eco-Voice,” a daily publication that offers thoughts and ideas for people who think it’s a good idea to monitor and protect our planet. Some may seem far-fetched, but a lot of what’s said makes good sense to me.

Even the Miami Super Bowl Committee is addressing our oceans and environmental stewardship through the O2E (Ocean to Everglades) Initiative. FWC member Rodney Barreto is the chairman of this committee. Our waters are finally being recognized as a big reason folks visit and live on Florida’s coasts. About 70 million visited in just the first six months of this year. That’s what supports our economy!

Our earth’s resources are finite, yet we take and take and simply ignore consequences. We have been greedy, lazy and selfish. Continuing on this path is akin to Russian roulette: Sooner not later it will fire and blow things up.

Many of us just complain. Try to be useful and instead look for workable solutions in your field of knowledge. Vet ideas thoroughly and make your voice heard. The squeaky wheel gets the attention —speak up and be heard. Use letters to the editor and social media to get your ideas out for discussion.

I’m getting tired of writing this kind of stuff, and I’m sure some of you are getting tired of reading it. But I can’t just sit silent while things are going to hell in a handbasket. Next week I promise we’ll talk fishing instead, OK? Remember that you can’t catch fish if you don’t go fishin’, so let’s go fishin’ soon.

Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has been a professional USCG-licensed year-round guide since 1976, and has been fishing the Southwest Florida coast since 1981. Contact him at 941-468-4017 or VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.

Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has been a professional USCG-licensed year-round guide since 1976, and has been fishing the Southwest Florida coast since 1981. Contact him at 941-468-4017 or VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.

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