CAPT. JOSH:

Well, Capt. Van certainly got Venice’s attention. Perhaps his facts were a bit off, but I think his heart was in the right place. I’ve reassessed my thoughts regarding fertilizer use. I didn’t know, when I moved to Florida and wanted a nice looking, lush and green lawn, that my choice of St. Augustine grass would require more water and fertilizer than any other, which I now regret. While I dislike government over-regulation, perhaps it’s time for the state to restrict fertilizer to agriculture use only. I’d be happy to see uniformly brown lawns in my neighborhood if it meant less damage to our environment, and that’s the message I’ll share with our elected officials.

— Philip Grudzinski

CAPT. JOSH:

Your comments about killing wildlife for sport hit home with me. It may be that humans are one of the few living things that kill for pleasure. During my youth in northern Idaho, carrying a 12-gauge shot gun, .22 rifle or the trusty .30-30 Winchester was almost a part of the uniform. We caught salmon during the annual run before dams stopped that. My mother canned 100 quarts of fish one year, and that helped us survive the long Idaho winters. Venison was our major meat. Cattle, pigs etc were sold. Ducks and geese, grouse and such were table food often. A large, several-acre garden gave the rest; welfare did not exist in the 1930s. All this “killing” in those days was to put food on the table of our farm home on the Clark Fork River and not done for entertainment as we see today. Boating is and should be much more than killing some poor dumb fish. Yet our culture seems motivated to start this mind set with young children. “Gone fishing” is akin to “gone golfing” and almost always with fishing poles and the excitement of a find-and-kill routine. Fishing tournaments abound and the goal does not seem to be providing food, but to teach and enjoy the sport of killing.

— John P. Derr

CAPT. JOSH:

I just finished reading the letter from the City of Venice regarding water treatment. That prompted me to look for a definition of highly treated reclaimed water. While I learned a lot from several websites, I was unable to obtain a precise definition. It appears that highly treated reclaimed water has the bacteria and other nasty things removed. However, it still contains some amounts of nitrogen and phosphates. How much? That I could not find. The City of Venice must have that data. Perhaps they would share it alongside the values for allowable discharge. Highly treated reclaimed water is a great use of a scarce resource for inland applications. Can the same be said of discharge back into the Gulf and its connected waterways?

— Charlie Wolley

CAPT. JOSH:

An alert to all who enjoy Sanibel and Captiva islands: There is a community panel on Captiva who is working to modify the ordinances for Captiva. This is a normal process to update current ordinances. This group is including a very small unnoticed proposal to the existing ordinances which will prohibit fishing from the Blind Pass Bridge. Yes, this will mean families, kids and seniors will be prohibited from fishing from the bridge as they’ve enjoyed forever. Please reach out to the Lee County and City of Sanibel Commissioners and voice your feelings. Please contact the Lee County Visitor and Convention Bureau and let them know how this affects you. This is an effort to take away one more place where we can enjoy or natural resources. It doesn’t matter who you are — young, old, resident or tourist — we will all be prohibited from fishing here at the will of a few people. Please view the Community Panel website and read the minutes from their meetings. It’s there in the print. Please share this with others who you consider stake holders in this concern. Thank you for your interest.

— Ed Waite

Letters are welcome on any outdoor-related subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters may be edited for length as well as grammar and spelling. We reserve the right to refuse any letter not signed with the writer’s full name. Slanderous or libelous material will not be published. The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse. The opinions and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. WaterLine and Sun Coast Media Group take no responsibility for the content of these letters.

Letters are welcome on any outdoor-related subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters may be edited for length as well as grammar and spelling. We reserve the right to refuse any letter not signed with the writer’s full name. Slanderous or libelous material will not be published. The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse. The opinions and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. WaterLine and Sun Coast Media Group take no responsibility for the content of these letters.

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