CAPT. JOSH:

Absolutely loved the Ralph Allen about “Childhood Lessons!” And then I hated the weird recipe about grinding fish in the blender and poaching after. Trying to visualize, and it was disgusting. Does anybody really try this stuff before you print?

— Jane Spaid

JANE:

Some of the recipes have been attempted by myself or another writer, and others have not. The one you refer to from last week, fish quenelles with sauce, seems weird but actually comes together very nicely. I made that recipe several years ago using mangrove snapper. It didn’t come out quite as well the quenelles I once had at some hoity Orlando restaurant whose name I have forgotten, but for making them at home and really having only a vague idea what I was doing, they turned out pretty good.

— Capt. Josh Olive, WaterLine Publisher

CAPT. JOSH:

I’ve sent the following letter to the FWC and thought you might want to reprint it: I am pleased that there has been a moratorium put on aquatic chemical applications and I would like to offer my input on the matter. For some years now, SWFWMD has been spraying a defoliant herbicide on upper Shell Creek in Charlotte County from an airboat. I have repeatedly asked them to stop this practice. I have over 1,000 feet of creekfront property and have officially protested this practice a number of times. (So now they turn off the spray as they go by my place, and immediately resume when past.) In all of my years here I have never seen any water hyacinths on the creek, and the little bit of bank-edge water lettuce has only served to filter some of the dissolved solids that plague the Punta Gorda drinking waters from meeting their minimum allowance, requiring a continual waiver. Incidentally, the only time I have ever seen any hydrilla in this creek was a few strands in the very shallow upper reaches. (I have seen other state waterways running filtered clear where masses of hydrilla existed.) This also has created a considerable loss of habitat for the many creatures near the bottom of the food chain that are the basis for the survival of the fish, turtles, birds and amphibians on up the chain. In spite of counter-claims, I cannot believe that this mindless spraying of what I call “our version of Agent Orange” is a healthy addition to the aquifer and our drinking water supply. Looking into who is dumping mud and fertilizer runoff could be a more productive use of funds. Please consider putting an end to this harmful and negative-balance-to-nature chemical application project.

— Rick Fried

Letters are welcome on any outdoor-related subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters may be edited for length as well as grammar and spelling. We reserve the right to refuse any letter not signed with the writer’s full name. Slanderous or libelous material will not be published. The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse. The opinions and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. WaterLine and Sun Coast Media Group take no responsibility for the content of these letters.

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