Capt. Josh:

Love your magazine. Capt. Van is always on the money — greed and stupidity are at the heart of our coastal problems. Thanks for all the advice and tips. But why do you continue to publish photos of folks holding large fish by the jaw? In the current issue, there's a huge bass being held up by the lip. You say this is terrible for the fish, yet you continue to publish photos contradicting your stand?

— Bob Kinsley

Bob:

I get this question fairly often, usually in face-to-face conversations. Our photo policy says that we don't run photos of poorly handled fish, if they must be released. However, if the fish are being kept, I figure the anglers can handle them as they see fit. The challenge is in fish that are legal to keep but being released anyway. You don't want to see them mishandled because it increases their chances of dying or having severe health issues after release. On the other hand, if I change the policy to require ethical handling of all fish, I'll have to exclude a lot of photos that I think people would like to see. And what should I do with photos of release-only snook being handled with dry towels when those fish were caught during a veterans charity event? Run them and mention the poor handling? That shames people publicly. Don't run them? I'd like to support the event, which is a good one. So what I end up doing is judging all the photos we get on a case-by-case basis. There are some that I run despite feeling marginal about them. There are many others I reject, generally notifying the sender why (unless it's someone who I already know should know better). Ultimately, it comes down to my judgment, which is imperfect and fallible. All I can do is keep trying to maintain the balance between the welfare of the fish we catch and our desire to show them off.

— Capt. Josh Olive, WaterLine Publisher

Capt. Josh:

A word of caution regarding footwear on the boat: My choice of sandals has worked well for many years, until recently. A small shell, stick, or some foreign managed to create a small puncture in my second toe. I am now entering my fifth week of IV therapy to cure a bone infection to avoid amputation. During this time, I've spoken to several other patients with similar issues and fewer toes. Consider the condition of our waters. There are vast amounts of bacteria living there that seem to enjoy living in you. If you get a nick, inspect and disinfect (sterile saline), then smear on Polysporin and cover. It can't hurt.

— Cliff Limpert

Cliff:

That's why I don't generally recommend sandals to other people. Everyone has to decide for themselves the level of risk with which they're comfortable.

— Capt. Josh Olive, WaterLine Publisher

Letters are welcome on any outdoor-related subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters may be edited for length as well as grammar and spelling. We reserve the right to refuse any letter not signed with the writer’s full name. Slanderous or libelous material will not be published. The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse. The opinions and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. WaterLine and Sun Coast Media Group take no responsibility for the content of these letters.

0
0
0
0
0

Load comments