double stack trailer

Photo provided

If you want to tow a boat and a road-going vehicle behind your RV, this is the sensible and safe way to do it.

Being an avid bass fisherman, towing is always a great concern for me when traveling in the RV. If the wind picks up, it can sometimes be a handful just to keep the RV moving straight in your lane. If you’re pulling another vehicle or trailer behind you, that just adds to the worries as you roll down the highway.

A few months back I wrote a column on triple towing; i.e., putting the truck behind the RV and the boat behind that. That column was very informative, but most of the information came from you, the readers. You informed me that there were restrictions on this kind of towing, and some states do not allow it on the interstate systems at all. You are relegated to state and county roads, as well as smaller highways. Having all that behind you can make towing an interesting job at best on those smaller roads.

The other issue is length. There is a maximum length for your entire tow package, which varies by state. In most states, it’s 65 feet, but can be shorter (Maryland, for example, permits only 55 feet. See https://bit.ly/2DWtq6y for a list.) Our Jayco is 37 feet, Add to that a bass boat on a trailer (another 28 feet), and I’m at the limit of most state length standards even without trying to fit the truck between the RV and the boat.

To stay legal, I’m looking into a stackable trailer, which will keep me comfortably under the maximum. Just by putting the boat on the lift on a stackable trailer, I can save a few feet. My bass boat trailer has a collapsible tongue. That alone buys me two feet in length. I can also trim the motor down once the boat and trailer are loaded onto a lift, which saves me another foot of length.

Now, there is a height limit for any vehicle: 13 feet, 6 inches. Obviously, you cannot go too high or you will scrape off the top of the trailer on the first overpass you encounter. Don’t want that, so I’ll try to stay under 13 feet.

Having looked around, I’ve found I can order a really nice enclosed stackable trailer with closets, workbenches, AC and a generator. I don’t think so. First of all, I am looking for functional, not livable. We have the RV for that. I would like to see the boat kept out of the elements when traveling, so my preference is an enclosed trailer.

I can get a stackable that isn’t enclosed. But with the boat being the top unit, I am not sure I like the idea of the boat being exposed on the trailer and praying that my cover holds together the first time we head out across state lines. However, I plan on pricing both out to see what that would look like financially. Luckily, I’m close to paying off the truck, so that payment may simply get redirected. Then again, I can wait a little bit because we are a few years away from doing any serious travel like that.

We’d like to buy and pay for what we can now. The plan is to have it all paid off by the time we get to retirement. After that, I only hope to be spry enough to handle all these fancy toys. Really, we just want things to be as simple as they can be, while still having access to all the fun we do today no matter where we travel to. And for that to happen, we really need to master how to tow it all.

Hopefully, we will find a trailer that fits the bill for what we want it to do. Got any more suggestions for me?

Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout Florida’s Heartland and enjoys RV travel around the Southeast with his wife and tournament partner, Missy. Contact him at Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.

Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout Florida’s Heartland and enjoys RV travel around the Southeast with his wife and tournament partner, Missy. Contact him at Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.

0
0
0
0
0

Load comments