St. Patrick’s Day is among the most festive days of the year. Whether you trace your ancestry to the Emerald Isle or not, chances are you have donned some green, danced a jig and/or hoisted a pint of Guinness in honor of St. Patrick on March 17.

The festive atmosphere on St. Patrick’s Day compels some people to overindulge in alcohol. While medical experts warn against such behavior, cautioning adults to only consume alcohol in moderation, many Paddy’s Day revelers throw such caution to the wind. In such instances, a post-Paddy’s Day hangover may be on tap. Many people have their own hangover cures, which may or may not be effective. For those with no such cures in their arsenals, the following strategies may be just the thing to make the day after St. Patrick’s Day go more smoothly.

• Stay hydrated throughout St. Patrick’s Day. If you’re going to be hoisting pints on St. Patrick’s Day, hoist glasses of water throughout the day as well. The International Alliance for Responsible Drinking recommends drinking water while consuming alcohol. The IARD notes that alcohol acts as a diuretic. That means that when the body breaks down alcohol, it removes water from the blood through your urine. That can contribute to dehydration, creating some of the more unpleasant effects associated with being hungover. Drink some water with each alcoholic beverage you consume.

• Consume electrolytes. According to Merck Source, alcohol interferes with the liver and pancreas, which can result in an imbalance of electrolytes. Electrolytes affect various parts of your body, including muscle function and other important processes. The medical resource Everyday Health notes that consuming electrolyte-rich beverages, including sports drinks, can restore the salt and potassium lost as a result of consuming alcohol.

• Get to the gym. While it might seem impossible after a night spent overindulging in alcohol, some moderate exercise may help you feel better, at least mentally. Make sure you’re fully hydrated before hitting the gym so you’re less vulnerable to muscle cramps or injury, and drink water while exercising as well. Exercise releases neurochemicals and hormones, including endorphins, that can help boost your mood and provide some energy on a day when you might benefit from both of those things.

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