ES3Dhouse090818.jpg

This illustration shows what the first home built locally with 3D printing technologies might look like. The goal is to have the first home built in the first quarter of next year.

ENGLEWOOD — Don Musilli is confident 3D Build Systems will soon construct homes with 3D printing technologies.

The first home could be built on a lot in Sarasota County as early as the first quarter of next year.

“Our goal has never been to be the first; our goal has been to be the best,” Musilli said. While new to the U.S., 3D construction has been implemented in Europe and China. Local engineers and contractors are interested in the process.

3D Build Systems is now working with two Canadian firms, Octopuz and I-Cubed, on the software and robot that will pour the cement for the interior and exterior walls of either for 600 square-foot to 1,400 square-foot homes. Basically, a robot would sit on a 5-inch-thick concrete slab as a mechanical arm pours layer by layer of pre-programed walls for a house. Once the walls are completed, the robot would be then lifted out by a crane.

“We have no lack of builders,” he said.

Due to a non-disclosure agreement, Musilli could not share details, but he said a U.S. based firm “in the Midwest” is now working on a special concrete mix to be utilized in the construction of the homes. He said the project is “on track.”

“The first test print of the house, test of the robot and system in total, should be done by mid- or late November,” Musilli said. “The walls will be extremely strong, five times stronger than a concrete block home.”

The homes will meet all of Sarasota County and Florida building codes.

If successful, Musilli said the walls for the homes could be constructed in 15 hours or less with a work crew of two or three individuals. The basic homes will be affordable, $150,000 or less nor will the homes detract from the values of neighborhoods. A 3D home can be built with curved walls and other features not seen with traditional concrete block homes, he suggested.

“Our approach is to try to keep the costs down,” Musilli said. “We can always add other structures to it. We’re trying to build architecturally attractive homes.”

Musilli is no stranger to 3D printing technologies. Through the nonprofit Englewood Incubation (Innovation) Center for eight years, Musilli has promoted 3D printing education and worked with local schools.

For more information, visit www.3dbuildsystems.co or email don musilli@3dbuildsystems.co. Call Musilli at 941-999-8200. 3D Build Systems also posted a video on YouTube entitled “Changing the World…or at least the way we BUILD it.”

0
0
0
0
0

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.