ENGLEWOOD — Tropical Depression Fred’s trip through the Gulf of Mexico did little to wash away red tide from local shorelines.

While not overwhelming, reports Monday suggest the scent of the toxic algae waft in the air and dead fish floated in the water or lapped up onto beaches.

“No smell so far today,” Mark Timchula reported on his social media page “Tim Chula” on Monday morning from Englewood Beach. “(Charlotte County) picked up three buckets of fish.”

Red tide, Karina brevis, is natural to the Gulf of Mexico in concentrations less than 10,000 cells per liter of water. However, when the concentrations exceed 100,000 cells per liter of water, humans can experience respiratory and other ailments. High concentrations can also kill fish and other marine life.

In the wake of the storm, Zoe Bass, who oversees Coastal Wildlife Club sea turtle patrols on Manasota Key, said the light scent of toxins from red tide was definitely in the air and dead fish floated ashore.

“The breeze is right, so that you only notice the red tide on the shore,” said Jean Ranallo who regularly enjoys morning swims at the public Manasota Beach.

“The Gulf is rough and the fish on the sand tend to be a foot or shorter, though there was one about three feet long,” Ranallo said in an email Monday.

Similarly, south of Stump Pass on Knight and Don Pedro Islands, Brenda Bossman, who oversees sea turtle volunteers, also caught scents of red tide in the air Monday.

A few dead fish, not many, washed up along the shoreline, Bossman said.

A week ago, water samples collected for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission showed medium and high concentrations from Gasparilla Island near Englewood, north to Sarasota County beaches and beyond at Anna Maria Island in Manatee County.

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