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Clemson and head coach Dabo Swinney will miss defensive tackle Dexter Lawrence in tonight’s college football national championship game against Alabama.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said suspended starting defensive tackle Dexter Lawrence will be missed against top-ranked Alabama in tonight’s College Football National Championship Game.

Swinney said Sunday that Lawrence has been a difference-maker in the middle of the line all season and would’ve been that against the Crimson Tide in the national championship game which will be held in Santa Clara.

Lawrence and offensive lineman Zach Giella and tight end Braden Galloway tested positive for ostarine in NCAA drug testing.

The three missed Clemson’s 30-3 victory over Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl last week.

Earlier this week, Clemson athletic director Dan Radakovich said the school filed appeals for the three players.

Lawrence is a 350-pound junior who has started the past three seasons. He’s also part of Clemson’s short-yardage “Fridge Package” on offense.

Alabama is a favorite against Clemson and the Tigers will have to play well to dethrone the Crimson Tide, who are the defending national champion.

Tonight’s game will be the third time that Clemson and Alabama have met for the national championship.

“I think being successful is really a formula,” Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban said. “We try to teach our players and hopefully some of the experiences that they have as football players carry over and help them be more successful in life.”

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