Our college gal recently questioned whether her new coffee pot should have come equipped with a reusable coffee filter. “They aren’t standard,” I explained. “You have to buy those separate.”

Knowing she had seen mine, I shared where she could pick one up. I still remember my own epiphany finding it on an end cap at Publix. As much coffee as I drink, it’s a good investment. Plus the fine sieve works great for the talc-like grind of my preferred roast.

Would you be surprised to know I remember my mom buying one of these years ago? It was a gold-colored mesh and she was quite careful with cleaning and storing to ensure it didn’t get damaged. Back then I rolled my eyes and grumbled. Now I get it. These fancy filters won’t work if a hole is poked in them. Where she exhibited much care, I can be less concerned as there’s always another readily available.

We joked how kids these days want everything it took our own parents most of their lives to get, but who are we kidding? That all changed in one generation with the availability of credit, mass-produced goods and Amazon. You want nice stuff? Ask the kids what they’ve bought online recently. That’s where the goods of life reside.

The fancy coveted kitchen gadgets of my mom’s generation are now easily purchased as good knock offs at every discount big box store too. They don’t work as well or last as long, but for our modern intermittent use it’s good enough. Rarely are we whipping up meals for large families or hosting formal dinner parties. Things are different now.

Less frequently used, it feels foolhardy to spend exorbitant amounts of money on counter top icons. Still, I’d love one of those ultra-blenders to make smoothies. My Stuffmart substitute screeches horribly as it tries to pulverize ice, sending our cats scrambling for the rest of their lives. Quality blenders are much quieter, but good gracious, the price tag equals that of a new phone. Guess which one wins the allocation of dough?

We recently laughed over the idea of an appliance garage as part of kitchen makeovers. Invest all this money and then tuck it away? That seems a bit crazy. Funny how we feel our homes look their best only when they appear as though no one lives in them.

We can also color-coordinate, whereas my mom’s generation had just a few options and expected to keep their appliances for decades. I doubt any of this stuff today is going to last 50 years even with minimal use. Have you noticed too that stainless steel is sliding out of favor and colored stoves are making a comeback? Everything comes back around. I wonder if green and gold will re-emerge as a favorite and push the white farmhouse look out to pasture.

Grey is emerging as the new black and lavender gains ground as an accent color. Can you imagine having a purple mixer? I bet that costs extra. As a matter of fact, it’s all quite pricey. The kitchen may be the heart of a home, but the cost of upgrading is enough to give one palpitations. I think I’ll brew myself some java.

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