Time to stop dancing around the problem

Editor:

My correspondence concerns the article “Experts on Water Quality Solutions.”

The experts gave their advice and did nothing but dance around the problem. Expert Abby Tyrna said that there are 40,000 septic tanks in the area. She estimated that it would cost $150,000,000 to convert to a sewer system to address the fecal bacteria problem on our beaches. Did she mean it was too much money to solve the problem?

When I lived in Marathon in the Keys, bacteria was found on the reefs. Afterward they installed a new vacuum sewer system and did away with all the old septic tank systems. It cost each homeowner $5,000, payable at $1,000 a year added to the homeowner’s taxes. This charge was tax deductible.

If the 40,000 homeowners here were charged $5,000 each, that would be $200,000,000, substantially more than what they need.

I know this is just one of many problems, but it’s one of the main reasons the beaches are closed. So why don’t we address this problem, pay our share, and stop dancing around the problem?

Robert La Barbera

Nokomis

Stop and think of the service workers

Editor:

Today’s headline in the paper has reawakened my extreme objection to the “hotel” being built on the “circus property.” The shortsightedness of such a decision is remarkable, just like not providing enough parking in the downtown area in an attempt to “keep the small town appearance,” and at the same time allowing the building of thousands of homes in and around Venice. That required the annexation of property for expansion. The parking area near our beaches has been tripled to account for the glut of new residents who wish to go to the beach. Where do you think they go to shop or for dinner or an evening out? Downtown.

The city of Venice could not keep operating with out low and minimum wage earning “working poor.” Many of our current employees need to live in North Port to be able to afford housing. The building of a hotel to cater to wealthy people is embarrassing to say the least. We need affordable housing for young workers and their families. Boat harbors, airports, luxury housing etc. are nice, but we cannot continue to ignore the housing needs of our clerks, waiters, waitresses, and cleaning staff that keep Venice what it is.

The wealthy will survive without a hotel for their guest that can afford to fly their private plane into our lovely airport, our working poor will not.

Please reconsider what you are about to do.

Gerald Authier

Venice

Politicians have put us woefully behind in cancer fight

Editor:

Not long ago, out illustrious former Governor Rick Scott turned down the offer of federal money that would have enabled our state to expand Medicaid that would have covered thousands and maybe tens of thousands of more low-income patients in our state.

Well the geese have finally flown home, because as a result, the American Cancer Society just announced to the world that Florida is one of the two worst, right along with the great state of Mississippi, in not hitting any of the benchmarks in the eight public policy priority areas for fighting cancer.

How many more will die prematurely from cancer that would have been living productive lives if ... if ... we had a lot smarter people running our state?

And just as bad is our dismal record of standing at the bottom of the list for the states with the lowest funding for mental health.

Look in the mirror citizens. It’s us who put these characters in office.

How proud are you?

Sure makes one wonder.

Ross Benjamin

Venice

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you

Load comments